Hey New York! Ethics in Human Research, please.

You want to know if your Homeless services and Prevention Programs really work – but what you are doing may not be ethical.  It certainly isn’t very nice. Yes, what you want to know is important: No, it is not important enough to justify the harm you are causing. In case you forgot – expedients with humans come with Ethical Guidelines.

“Researchers must adhere to three principles in order to ethically conduct research on human subjects, according to Milstein. “First, the researcher/physician must believe that the human subject in the experiment has at least the same chance of doing as well as a patient in standard therapy.”

Second, human subjects must be selected equitably. “You’ve got to avoid vulnerable populations, such as the very sick and the poor. Using money as an inducement, in my view, is unethical.”

And finally, “You still have to have informed consent. You have to have a document and a process where you explain the procedure, the risks, and the benefits.”

Milstein stressed that a signed informed consent document doesn’t relieve researchers of their ethical obligations.

“The informed consent document doesn’t evidence either that the participant is informed or that he or she consents,” he said. “There’s an ethical duty on the researcher to make sure that the subject understands the process and risks and is not coerced into giving consent.” http://www.law.virginia.edu/html/news/2008_spr/milstein.htm

read more :http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/09/nyregion/09placebo.html

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