Miscarriage in Minnesota = No Welfare for you

Change.org wrote an article about mothers who had a miscarriage and then were barred from welfare. That is NOT exactly how the rules play out. Los Angeles CA has the same rules as Minnesota – and I agree with them.  Hang on – and let me explain in-depth and detail and then we will discuss.

 This is from the Minnesota 191 page guidebook. (Yes, I read it all just to talk to you about this). the law is in red and my remarks are in black just below each point. 30 Minn. Stat. § 256J.24, subd. 6.

families who apply for DWP or MFIP assistance on or after July 1, 2003, the child is born to the adult parent within ten months of the date the family is eligible for assistance

 So, if you apply for welfare and don’t know you are pregnant, or become pregnant soon after: too soon for birth control to become effective let’s say, that child will be allowed aid. However, if you applied for Welfare and are CURRENTLY RECIEVING WELFARE, you are  aware that you don’t have the resources to financially support and feed your family but CHOOSE to add children to your family: the state has the right to point out that your decision was a poor one and not add that child to the burden of tax dollars supporting you. This was the crux of WELFARE REFORM and is one of the key points to moving families off a continued Longterm Welfare Lifestyle

    

the child was conceived as a result of a sexual assault or incest, provided that the incident has been reported to a law enforcement agency;

 Okay, this child will be aided because you did not plan to add children to your family but it was beyond your control.  By the way, in LA if you can prove you were on long term birth control like an IUD or Depro, the child will be aided

the child’s mother is a minor caregiver and the child, or children, are the mother’s first birth;

 Under the age of 18 – your first-born child/children will receive aid. If you apply for aid as a minor and have many children of different ages, they will be covered. Any future children born after aid has been started will not be unless those children fall into the guidelines above :Rape, incest, born within 10 months of applying for current aid received. In LA we have CalLEARN and I am not exactly sure what our rules are. I can look that up tomorrow

the adult parent or parents have not received DWP benefits or MFIP assistance in the previous ten months. This applies to any child previously excluded in determining family size.

So, you received aid but then were financially soluable for almost a year before needing to apply for aid. Any new children born within that 10 month time line will be eligible. BUT- you have to be OFF AID for 10 months. The theory is that you thought you would be able to support your family and the new addition and were self sustaining but then came back for assistance: either with a new child in the family or one on the way since the aid is also for pregnant mother.  

WHAT is the fuss about? 

If a mother loses a child due to miscarriage and then applies for aid – she will be approved unless she is applying for aid within the 10 month window where ANY and ALL families are required to be off aid before additional children qualify. Remember that this rule does not apply if you have been assaulted and were not able to choose not to have additional children you could not support. No one is punishing or discriminating against the poor for pregnancies that do not come to term. The laws are in place to discourage people from having additional children to increase the cash aid given , or to increase the amount of time the family will stay on cash aid.  

  

It is a good law and EXPLAINED to each participant in the program when they enroll and ask for assistance : at least it is in Los Angeles County. A mother who has sadly lost her unborn child is aware that she must not apply for aid for a new child until 10 months are passed. Seemingly – if she needed and deserved assistance during the first pregnancy , she is aware that she must improve her sustainability before parenting another child.

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